Pictures of Post-Catholic Ireland

Last weekend, Ireland received a visitor whom some regarded as extra special and others regarded as controversial – the Pope. Much has been written about his visit, so there isn’t a great deal more I can say about it. But I do carry two pictures in my mind which I think neatly represent this country’s relationship with Catholicism.

In one picture, thousands of people stand before the Pope at a shrine in Knock, in the windblown West of Ireland. They clutch rosary beads and wave yellow and white papal flags. In unison, they chant responses while the pope leads them in the Angelus. Soft rain falls on them, but they are oblivious, their rapt faces focused on the small white figure standing in front of them.

Pope Visit to Knock
Crowds gather to see the Pope in Knock. Photo credit: The Irish Times

In the second picture, another crowd gathers at a garden in Dublin, singing and swaying to the strains of a popular band. In their hands, they hold coloured placards which proclaim truth and justice. They are standing in solidarity with people who have suffered abuse at the hands of the clergy.

Stand for Truth Protest
Stand for Truth Protest. Photo Credit: The Journal.ie

Creating a New Picture

These are the pictures of post-Catholic Ireland, a country with a strong kernel of faith, but a country which is also kicking down the walls of the institution that it clung to for so long. Seeing these two pictures, I was faced with the uncomfortable realisation that none of them quite fits me. I admire the faith and devotion of the people in the first picture and the integrity and compassion of the people in the second.

I don’t go to Mass anymore, and for many reasons, I think it would be hypocritical to go on calling myself a Catholic. But nor do I want to kick down the walls of the institution. What will be left for us when those walls are gone?

Those of us who fall into the uncomfortable vacuum between belief and disbelief, what I call the floundering faithful, may have to create a new picture for ourselves. It will be interesting to see what picture emerges in the coming years. I would like to think of it as a collage of different beliefs, resting

 

4 thoughts on “Pictures of Post-Catholic Ireland

  1. Eilish Dunworth

    Deeply insightful blog entry that encapsulates what many of us were struggling to verbalise in recent weeks. I particularly like your final word – ‘resting’ – it conjures up a peaceful transition. Let’s hope.

    Like

    1. Aw, thanks, Eilish. I hope the transition will be peaceful too, but I sometimes detect a note of scorn towards practising Catholics and the remaining clergy which dismays me, usually from the media. But I do think the situation merits careful observation – perhaps attitudes are more diverse than they seem.

      Like

  2. Fine post, Derbhile, but I couldn’t help smiling at your reference to the “rap faces” of the pilgrims in Knock … such an image of a sea of heads with backwards baseball hats, bling necklaces and all sorts of weird hand gestures …

    Liked by 1 person

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